How To Get Your Dog To Do What You Want - Autographed

$ 16.00

Synopsis: Warren's book of insights, witty observations and step-by-step advice for communicating with your dog - including:
  • Hassle-Free housebreaking
  • Recognizing your dog's state-of-mind and health
  • Training ABC's - from sitting to heeling and beyond
  • Traveling with your dog
  • The art of peaceful and effective discipline
  • Coping with canine old age
  • Diet,grooming, and dentistry tips to keep your friend glowing, inside and out

Why settle for anything less than a best friend? Every dog wants to perform - and deservedly gain your love and affection. With Warren Eckstein's expert guidance, you can forget about frustration and disobedience, and enjoy years with a loyal, alert, and very happy dog!

From Publishers Weekly
Pop psychology and greeting-card effusiveness thickly pad the excellent training tips in this manual. Warren Eckstein, host of a syndicated radio program called The Pet Show, and a monthly visitor to TV's Live! With Regis and Kathie Lee, and his wife (who disappears in the first-person-singular prose) urge readers to aid their dogs in the incalculably important tasks of "image-and confidence-building" and in developing "self-esteem" and "inner strength." It's hard to take seriously both the admonitions against "spreading gossip" about the family pet and the suggestions that readers tape-record themselves practicing "various types of woofs" (to improve their fluency in dog-speak) and equip their homes with a "doggy gym or physical fitness center." There's also some tiresome name-dropping of celebrity clients and a little name-brand-dropping. But those who persevere will find helpful discussions about introducing a second pet or a new baby into the household; remedies for excessive barking and other unwanted behaviors; and sound training principles. Photos not seen by PW.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
The Ecksteins take the newer, refreshing approach that the dog is a family member and should be treated with love and respect. The owner's responsibility is to learn to understand his or her pet and communicate well with it. To accomplish this, the authors provide sound information on understanding a dog's body language and emotions and goes on to state that behavior problems result from boredom (on the dog's part). At least half of this book discusses techniques for training the "basic five" commands: heel, sit, come, down, and stay. The authors emphasize the importance of praise and consistency. However, their corrective jerk on the leash is falling in disfavor as more progressive trainers look to motivational techniques to train dogs. Also, the use of the "shake can" to startle the dog is strikingly inconsistent with the philosophy in the first part of the book. The names used throughout for the imaginary dogs-Fido, Fluffy, and Clydie Poops-are somewhat irritating. Despite its minor flaws, this book is recommended for libraries needing an inexpensive source of good information on raising dogs. (Illustrations and index not seen.)-Edell Marie Schaefer, Brookfield P.L., Wis.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

"How to Get Your Dog to Do What You Want is so full of helpful information and is so easy & fun to read, too."
- Shari W., Los Angeles

"Too bad Warren isn't a marriage counselor! If only he could do for husbands what he does for dogs!"
- Kathie Lee Gifford

Sold Out

How To Get Your Dog To Do What You Want - Autographed
Synopsis: Warren's book of insights, witty observations and step-by-step advice for communicating with your dog - including:
  • Hassle-Free housebreaking
  • Recognizing your dog's state-of-mind and health
  • Training ABC's - from sitting to heeling and beyond
  • Traveling with your dog
  • The art of peaceful and effective discipline
  • Coping with canine old age
  • Diet,grooming, and dentistry tips to keep your friend glowing, inside and out

Why settle for anything less than a best friend? Every dog wants to perform - and deservedly gain your love and affection. With Warren Eckstein's expert guidance, you can forget about frustration and disobedience, and enjoy years with a loyal, alert, and very happy dog!

From Publishers Weekly
Pop psychology and greeting-card effusiveness thickly pad the excellent training tips in this manual. Warren Eckstein, host of a syndicated radio program called The Pet Show, and a monthly visitor to TV's Live! With Regis and Kathie Lee, and his wife (who disappears in the first-person-singular prose) urge readers to aid their dogs in the incalculably important tasks of "image-and confidence-building" and in developing "self-esteem" and "inner strength." It's hard to take seriously both the admonitions against "spreading gossip" about the family pet and the suggestions that readers tape-record themselves practicing "various types of woofs" (to improve their fluency in dog-speak) and equip their homes with a "doggy gym or physical fitness center." There's also some tiresome name-dropping of celebrity clients and a little name-brand-dropping. But those who persevere will find helpful discussions about introducing a second pet or a new baby into the household; remedies for excessive barking and other unwanted behaviors; and sound training principles. Photos not seen by PW.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
The Ecksteins take the newer, refreshing approach that the dog is a family member and should be treated with love and respect. The owner's responsibility is to learn to understand his or her pet and communicate well with it. To accomplish this, the authors provide sound information on understanding a dog's body language and emotions and goes on to state that behavior problems result from boredom (on the dog's part). At least half of this book discusses techniques for training the "basic five" commands: heel, sit, come, down, and stay. The authors emphasize the importance of praise and consistency. However, their corrective jerk on the leash is falling in disfavor as more progressive trainers look to motivational techniques to train dogs. Also, the use of the "shake can" to startle the dog is strikingly inconsistent with the philosophy in the first part of the book. The names used throughout for the imaginary dogs-Fido, Fluffy, and Clydie Poops-are somewhat irritating. Despite its minor flaws, this book is recommended for libraries needing an inexpensive source of good information on raising dogs. (Illustrations and index not seen.)-Edell Marie Schaefer, Brookfield P.L., Wis.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

"How to Get Your Dog to Do What You Want is so full of helpful information and is so easy & fun to read, too."
- Shari W., Los Angeles

"Too bad Warren isn't a marriage counselor! If only he could do for husbands what he does for dogs!"
- Kathie Lee Gifford

$ 16.00
Ask a question about How To Get Your Dog To Do What You Want

More from this collection

  • Visa
  • MasterCard
  • Amex
  • Discover
  • PayPal
Sale

Unavailable

Sold Out